Local News | Sports - High School
Monday, November 24, 2014 8:58 AM

Last week, the theme of the comic strip “Pickles” (drawn by Brian Crane) hit way too close to home. Of course I must admit this is often the case because the two main characters, Opal and Fred, seem to be about our age. Like us, they are dealing with some of the irritations of aging.

  • My parents and I traveled to Mankato on Sunday, Nov. 16, to celebrate my nephew Joshua’s eighth birthday. This was one of the few times we were able to celebrate on his actual birthday, which he loves. He calls the parties we have had in the past, on days other than his actual birthday, “pretend birthdays.” We have also had “pretend Christmasses” and “pretend Thanksgivings,” but that’s what we get for loving a literal-thinking child. 
  • I guess you could say that winter has arrived. Since it’s so terribly cold this early on and we have snow that’s not going away any time soon, we might as well buck up, get our big boy and big girl snow pants out, and plan on wearing them for a good six months. Ugh.

     
  • He ate food without fear, claiming to be an undiscovered genius. He complained that his second order of goulash tasted like wood. He professed to be so old that on his last birthday they gave him two cakes to provide room for all the candles. He was waiting for his long-suffering wife, Elizabeth. “The Beth” was yet to come. 

     
  • Winter caught me by surprise. Lulled by the extended fall weather, I forgot to take cuttings from my outdoor geraniums before the final solid freeze.

     
  • Bookworm Sez: Feast upon the mischievous tale of ‘The Great Thanksgiving Escape’

    Your chair is at the kids’ table, just like it always is. Your brothers and sisters, your mom’s friend’s kids, all you youngsters (as Grandma calls you), even your favorite cousin will be there, too. There’s just no way to avoid it – unless, as in “The Great Thanksgiving Escape,” by Mark Fearing, you can run… fast!

     
  • Last week, the theme of the comic strip “Pickles” (drawn by Brian Crane) hit way too close to home. Of course I must admit this is often the case because the two main characters, Opal and Fred, seem to be about our age. Like us, they are dealing with some of the irritations of aging.

     
  • As the time spent in daylight each day becomes shorter and the temperatures outside drop, memories of last winter resurface from the place we all banished them last spring. It’s hard to think about going back to a time where many of us preferred to stay home, burrowed in our quilts, avoiding the snow and cold that were dominating our region. 
  • Today is a new day . . .  a new beginning. You have been given this day to use as you please. You can waste it or you can use it for something worthwhile. Either way, what you do today is important because you are exchanging a day of your life for it.

     
  • Geology. It’s kind of a crazy thing when you really think about it. It’s the process by which factors – such as long-ago, huge glaciers, to name just one factor, or the lack of glaciers  – can create very different looking landscapes and a variety of squiggled lines on a topographic map.

     
  • I offered a handshake and a howdy. 

     
  • Bookworm Sez: Young girls will enjoy historical chapter book

    A move from California to Colorado is at the heart of the new book “Red Berries White Clouds Blue Sky” by Sandra Dallas – but this move is not good at all.

     
  • In the couple of days leading up to our final moments in our Lanesboro home, we actually slept at the permanent camper we had purchased at the Old Barn. That way we could finish moving stuff out and do the final cleaning. I remember at the time that spending a couple of days in that camper would make the condo feel quite large.

     
  • Yes, they’re always in a state of flux . . . for example, from the promise of spring to the ridiculously late, late spring snow . . . from bright sunshine to destructive storms . . . from floods to drought and back again.

     
  • I was in Duluth recently, attending a kind of food rally. OK, they didn't call it that, but afterward I felt a sort of euphoria that one gets only at a break-through moment.

     
  • I was getting a hotel room. I'd stayed there before. They offered a continental breakfast, but it was a cooked continental breakfast.

     
Thanksgiving travel

How far are you traveling over the Thanksgiving holiday?


 

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