Ostrander City Council

Sets size limits

The Ostrander City Council set size limits for the brush dump and banned pets in city parks during its regular meeting on June 6.

The council addressed the issue of setting a size limit for branches and trees allowed at the brush dump, as recent large drop-offs would take a long time to burn. Mayor Pat Nesler suggested setting a limit of six inches and posting new signs at the brush dump with drop-off dates and the city phone number. This was approved by the council.

In response to reports of dog feces being found on the city mower and a city employee’s shoes, the council approved an amendment of park ordinances to ban pets from Ostrander city parks.



Kingsland School Board

Holds public hearing

Kingsland’s School Board held a public hearing last Monday, June 5, in the Kingsland High School cafeteria to address its finances, the proposed closure of the Wykoff school building and the prospect of relocating all students in grades four through six to the Spring Valley site, where all Kingsland’s students would be housed.

All six board members – Doug Plaehn, Deb Larson, Ann Oeltjen, Jackie Horsman, Tiffany Mundfrom and Heather Betts – were present, as were the district’s superintendent and principal. Several district residents also turned out to give the board their input during the hearing.



Fillmore County Board

Reviews personnel policies

Fillmore County’s commissioners handled housekeeping items during their first meeting of the month, held Tuesday, June 6.

Human Resources officer Kristina Kohn shared the first reading of proposed updates to the paid time off (PTO) policy, as well as the first reading of the updates to the compensation policy, the second reading of the electronic communication policy and the purchasing by credit card policy, the severance pay policy, and the purchasing policy.

Additionally, she requested permission to hire a temporary accounting technician for the auditor-treasurer’s office.



Kingsland School Board

Hears citizen input

Several of the more than 75 people who turned out for the public hearing on the proposed closure of the Wykoff school building registered their opinions before the Kingsland School Board Monday, June 5.

The hearing started with a presentation by Superintendent John McDonald on the implications of enrollment, the operating referendum levy and building configuration. The board then opened up the hearing to comments from the public, although Chairman Doug Plaehn said the members would not respond to questions.

Wykoff resident and former Wykoff City Council member LeRoy Rowe stood up first to give his comment, advising the board to consider its decision carefully because the communities will remember what that decision was 35 years from now.



Houston County Board

Updated on ‘hazardous’ building

The Houston County Board of Commissioners heard from Environmental Services director Rick Frank at its meeting on Tuesday, June 6.

He reviewed a recent District Court order regarding the physical condition of an old school building near Houston in Money Creek Township.

According to Frank, the property owner has until Aug.1 to bring the building up to compliance. If that does not happen, he said the board can proceed to raze the building after approving a resolution and public hearing last December.



Fountain City Council

Considers options

The Fountain City Council continues to research its options for law enforcement once Police Chief Tom Mosher retires later this year. On Wednesday, June 7, the council addressed the issue with a possible solution in the person of Ben Standahl from Caledonia.

Standahl is currently working for the Lewiston Police Department as the main part-time deputy. After learning about Fountain, he made contact with the city to see if the city would be interested in keeping the department going in the future.

The council will continue to look into all of its options before making a decision.



City of Rushford Village

Taking steps to complete project

The June 6 City of Rushford Village (CRV) meeting saw the council taking steps to officially complete the construction project in South Rushford from 2016.

The project was a source of great frustration for the council as McHugh Excavating missed deadlines, didn’t work on days that they indicated they would, and the firm got into a battle with the council over payments.

The CRV council members were glad when the project reached “substantial completion” last fall. However, there were still some minor issues that needed to be attended to this spring including paving two cracked driveways. As of the CRV’s meeting, McHugh still had not completed the contract.

The council unanimously approved a letter for city attorney Tom Manion to write and send. If McHugh takes no action, the council may pursue some form of litigation



Rushford City Council

Lowers price on building

After discussing the issue with Rod Darr of Darr Realty for some time Monday night, the Rushford City Council agreed to drop the asking price on the former municipal liquor store building from $250,000 to $219,900.

Last October, the council enlisted the services of Darr to sell the building. “We’ve had quite a bit of action,” Darr reported during the June 12 council meeting. “There have been eight different parties that expressed interest in it, including a winery, Wausau Homes and a party that wanted it for office space. But they all said the same thing, they couldn’t cash flow it at that price. “

A motion to set the price at $219,900 was made by councilor Mark Honsey and second by Terri Benson and unanimously approved.



Ostrander City Council

Sets size limits

The Ostrander City Council set size limits for the brush dump and banned pets in city parks during its regular meeting on June 6.

The council addressed the issue of setting a size limit for branches and trees allowed at the brush dump, as recent large drop-offs would take a long time to burn. Mayor Pat Nesler suggested setting a limit of six inches and posting new signs at the brush dump with drop-off dates and the city phone number. This was approved by the council.

In response to reports of dog feces being found on the city mower and a city employee’s shoes, the council approved an amendment of park ordinances to ban pets from Ostrander city parks.



Kingsland School Board

Holds public hearing

Kingsland’s School Board held a public hearing last Monday, June 5, in the Kingsland High School cafeteria to address its finances, the proposed closure of the Wykoff school building and the prospect of relocating all students in grades four through six to the Spring Valley site, where all Kingsland’s students would be housed.

All six board members – Doug Plaehn, Deb Larson, Ann Oeltjen, Jackie Horsman, Tiffany Mundfrom and Heather Betts – were present, as were the district’s superintendent and principal. Several district residents also turned out to give the board their input during the hearing.



Fillmore County Board

Reviews personnel policies

Fillmore County’s commissioners handled housekeeping items during their first meeting of the month, held Tuesday, June 6.

Human Resources officer Kristina Kohn shared the first reading of proposed updates to the paid time off (PTO) policy, as well as the first reading of the updates to the compensation policy, the second reading of the electronic communication policy and the purchasing by credit card policy, the severance pay policy, and the purchasing policy.

Additionally, she requested permission to hire a temporary accounting technician for the auditor-treasurer’s office.



Kingsland School Board

Hears citizen input

Several of the more than 75 people who turned out for the public hearing on the proposed closure of the Wykoff school building registered their opinions before the Kingsland School Board Monday, June 5.

The hearing started with a presentation by Superintendent John McDonald on the implications of enrollment, the operating referendum levy and building configuration. The board then opened up the hearing to comments from the public, although Chairman Doug Plaehn said the members would not respond to questions.

Wykoff resident and former Wykoff City Council member LeRoy Rowe stood up first to give his comment, advising the board to consider its decision carefully because the communities will remember what that decision was 35 years from now.



Houston County Board

Updated on ‘hazardous’ building

The Houston County Board of Commissioners heard from Environmental Services director Rick Frank at its meeting on Tuesday, June 6.

He reviewed a recent District Court order regarding the physical condition of an old school building near Houston in Money Creek Township.

According to Frank, the property owner has until Aug.1 to bring the building up to compliance. If that does not happen, he said the board can proceed to raze the building after approving a resolution and public hearing last December.



Fountain City Council

Considers options

The Fountain City Council continues to research its options for law enforcement once Police Chief Tom Mosher retires later this year. On Wednesday, June 7, the council addressed the issue with a possible solution in the person of Ben Standahl from Caledonia.

Standahl is currently working for the Lewiston Police Department as the main part-time deputy. After learning about Fountain, he made contact with the city to see if the city would be interested in keeping the department going in the future.

The council will continue to look into all of its options before making a decision.



City of Rushford Village

Taking steps to complete project

The June 6 City of Rushford Village (CRV) meeting saw the council taking steps to officially complete the construction project in South Rushford from 2016.

The project was a source of great frustration for the council as McHugh Excavating missed deadlines, didn’t work on days that they indicated they would, and the firm got into a battle with the council over payments.

The CRV council members were glad when the project reached “substantial completion” last fall. However, there were still some minor issues that needed to be attended to this spring including paving two cracked driveways. As of the CRV’s meeting, McHugh still had not completed the contract.

The council unanimously approved a letter for city attorney Tom Manion to write and send. If McHugh takes no action, the council may pursue some form of litigation



Rushford City Council

Lowers price on building

After discussing the issue with Rod Darr of Darr Realty for some time Monday night, the Rushford City Council agreed to drop the asking price on the former municipal liquor store building from $250,000 to $219,900.

Last October, the council enlisted the services of Darr to sell the building. “We’ve had quite a bit of action,” Darr reported during the June 12 council meeting. “There have been eight different parties that expressed interest in it, including a winery, Wausau Homes and a party that wanted it for office space. But they all said the same thing, they couldn’t cash flow it at that price. “

A motion to set the price at $219,900 was made by councilor Mark Honsey and second by Terri Benson and unanimously approved.