Local News | Sports - High School
 
Tuesday, May 26, 2015 9:17 AM

During a conversation with a local woman who is interested in getting young people to vote and become more involved in the political process, a comment she made stunned me for a moment. She said that the parents of young people today have never seen effective government in action.

  • It is very confusing to a reader when Greg Davids states he is both AGAINST and FOR land buffers.

     
  • It's undeniable that our rural towns are different than they were even one generation ago. There are a few less businesses, a few more shuttered houses. To passersby, it might appear that these places are dying, some already dead. Certainly, books like Joseph Amato's “Decline of Rural Minnesota” (1993) and Patrick Carr and Maria Kefalas' “Hollowing Out the Middle” (2010) tell the story of young people moving out, deaths outpacing births, and the decline of agriculture as a primary economic engine.

     
  • The narrative on the future of small towns seems to be undergoing a subtle change away from the gloom that dominated the storyline in recent years to a more complex view that includes several reasons for optimism.

     
  • During a conversation with a local woman who is interested in getting young people to vote and become more involved in the political process, a comment she made stunned me for a moment. She said that the parents of young people today have never seen effective government in action.

     
  • Residents who were incorrectly concerned that I do not support land buffers can rest easier tonight.

     
  • As I was wandering through the finish area of the Almanzo 100 in Spring Valley Saturday around 5 p.m. with my camera, I was stopped a couple times by bicyclists, handed cell phones and asked if I could take “selfies” of them. They didn’t ask for anything in the background, just a photo of them after finishing the 100-mile race on gravel roads throughout Fillmore County that took about eight hours.

     
  • From 2008 to 2011, Duane Benson spent much of his time being an advocate for the state’s youngest residents, pushing for quality early childhood learning. The former state senator and Lanesboro area farmer was the executive director of the Minnesota Early Learning Foundation (MELF) at the time.

     
  • Monday morning as I was flying from Pittsburgh to Minnesota, I was writing this column, editing news stories, formatting photos and, if I had time, designing pages for this week’s edition. In other words, I was at my desk, which just happened to be a laptop more than 10,000 feet above earth.

     
  • Greg Rendahl recently expressed his disappointment with my opposition to Gov. Dayton's idea requiring 50-foot buffer zones along rivers and streams (Bluff Country Reader letter April 20 edition). He thinks I'm catering to the interests of a few "greedy" farmers.

     
  • Minnesota State FFA Secretary Valerie Earley was the main speaker at the Spring Valley-Wykoff FFA banquet last week. She felt at home since it really has been home for the Wykoff resident, who noted she is a “proud” member of the chapter even though she graduated from Kingsland High School in 2014.

     
  • The United Nations — via the Refugee Resettlement Program — is behind our refugee situation. It’s time to bring this fact “out of the shadows.” Up to 95 percent of the refugees currently present in the U.S. — large numbers from terrorist-sponsoring countries — were ordered here by the U.N. high commissioner for refugees. Then they call for their family members, and on it goes.

     
  • A neighborhood brimming with gang violence, nudity, extremely coarse language, and drug and alcohol abuse isn’t a place for kids, particularly impressionable youth about to enter their teen years.

     
  • The controversy surrounding the “religious freedom” laws some states have tried to enact and the fatal incidents involving white police shooting black suspects have led to national dialogue on institutional discrimination or prejudice. Activists are inspecting laws and internal policies to make sure people are treated equally.

     
  • Indiana was in the national spotlight last week after the Legislature passed a “religious freedom” law that was signed by Gov. Mike Pence. Although the original intent may have held true to its name, many thought it was a smokescreen to allow businesses to discriminate against people by citing religious beliefs if they get sued.

     
  • With housing being considered a basic need, the state does a lot to help ensure Minnesotans of all ages and incomes are able to find an affordable place to rent or own. This was the focus of discussions I had recently with some Albert Lea constituents who work with Minnesota Coalition for the Homeless.

     
Water Contamination

Scientists with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency found widespread contamination of pharmaceuticals drugs along with other chemicals within the state’s lakes and rivers. Do you think more needs to be done to address this issue?



 

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