Chelcie Busch based her History Day project on the 1966 Miranda vs. Arizona court case — which led to the creation of Miranda rights.  SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chelcie Busch based her History Day project on the 1966 Miranda vs. Arizona court case — which led to the creation of Miranda rights. SUBMITTED PHOTO
<
1
2
>
Two Mabel-Canton students competed in the southeast regional History Day competition at Winona State University on March 3. This year's theme was "Rights and Responsibilities in History."

"History Day is a great opportunity for students to explore a topic in history," said Mabel-Canton history teacher Jessica Hahn Miller. "The theme this year is Rights and Responsibilities and both of their (the students') projects revolved around this theme. The projects are done outside of the school day so it takes dedication to get it completed by the regional competition in March."

Junior Hannah Nolte completed an individual performance project titled "When things go Boom: The Washburn Explosion."

"It was all on the viewpoint from the workers' wives on when the flower mill in Minneapolis blew up in 1878," Nolte explained. "I got to dress up like someone from the 1800s and then you give your presentation, state your facts but also make yourself a character."

Nolte said it was the affect it had on the people that led her to pick the topic. "It had a huge effect on families...and it was something that happened in our own state."

Nolte's project advanced to the state competition and will be presented at the University of Minnesota in May.

Checlie Busch did her project on the 1966 Miranda vs. Arizona Supreme Court case.

"It describes how the Miranda rights came about today," Busch said. For the project, she created an exhibit and answered questions on the topic before judges.

"I've always liked Supreme Court cases and I wanted to do something that still had effect today - and Miranda rights are basically used every day."

Busch also said she likes history because of its influence on how individuals act today and how the country has developed.

"If it was not for the people in history, we would not be here," Busch concluded.

"Both Chelcie and Hannah have spent lots of time preparing for this event and both have competed in it before. The focus of History Day is to get students interested in a topic and to have them learn how to research, cite sources and present information for others to learn from," Hahn-Miller said.