Josh Rasmussen, a contractor from Rushford, was recently working on this home theatre project. The large-screen television is hung on the front wall, with six reclining chairs facing it. A bar was added behind the chairs for additional seating. MATTHEW RODENBURG/BLUFF COUNTRY NEWSPAPER GROUP
Josh Rasmussen, a contractor from Rushford, was recently working on this home theatre project. The large-screen television is hung on the front wall, with six reclining chairs facing it. A bar was added behind the chairs for additional seating. MATTHEW RODENBURG/BLUFF COUNTRY NEWSPAPER GROUP

Home improvements are becoming more and more common. One of the most common ideas is to turn a basement into a home theatre. This isn’t surprising as ticket prices and concessions can make a night at the movies for two easily cost close to $50 dollars. The accessibility of Netflix, Blu-Ray players, and RedBox all are factors that cause homeowners to invest in this big budget project.

Josh Rasmussen, a homebuilder from Rushford, is currently finishing work on a home theater for a local homeowner. Rasmussen has been doing renovations for the last several weeks, and is looking to be done by the middle of this month. 

To begin with, Rasmussen framed the theatre. “I framed the walls, the stage and tray ceiling,” he said as he provided a tour of the almost-finished theatre. A trey ceiling is when the ceiling is structured so it has the appearance of an inverted tray. 

After framing was completed, the electrical work began. The overhead lights are set on a dimmer switch and running around the trey ceiling are LED lights. Rasmussen said the biggest frustration of the electrical work is making sure the wires are accessible, in case any cords short out.

“When you wire everything together, make sure you check if it works before you sheetrock,” said Rasmussen. 

Behind the television and sheetrocked wall the TV is hung on, there are HDMI cords, audio cables, power cords and plenty of other wires that can be a hassle to get to. Rasmussen inserted a tubing behind the televisions for the cords to run through in case any of them need to be replaced.

Once the wires were hooked up, Rasmussen was ready to insulate, soundproof and sheetrock the walls. By this point, the theatre room had its general structure and the furniture could be moved in.

In this theatre room, there are six seats with luxurious amenities. These chairs can massage tired bodies, warm a person, cool the drinks in the cup holder and, of course, recline.

The room also holds a bar along the back, for extra seating.

Much of the home theatre furniture was found on the Internet trade or auction sites.

“Craigslist is a good spot to find deals,” said Rasmussen. “I’m just looking for deals all of the time.”

The Internet wasn’t just good for locating furniture, but also was used extensively in the planning stages.

“I designed (the room) based off of what was recommended on the Internet,” explained Rasmussen.

If Rasmussen had any questions during the planning stages, he turned to Google. Theatre forums and advice from experts and other theatre creators helped him decide what to put in the theatre and what to avoid.

It was in the planning stage that Rasmussen found the biggest hassles.

“The design took the longest,” he said. “Things like: how you want the rooms designed, practicality. You want it to be well-planned. You plan every single piece of everything, then it all comes together nicely.”

Rasmussen even placed backing boards where posters would be hung, as the specifics were thoroughly accounted for.

Though many may desire to undertake a project like this, Rasmussen warns those who don’t have much experience.

“Honestly, it’s more than a DIY,” said Rasmussen. “You should hire somebody, because there are going to be things that you’re not going to think of.”

As for this specific home theatre project, Rasmussen concluded, “I’m very happy how it’s come out so far.”