Local News | Sports - High School
 
Friday, April 18, 2014 9:37 AM
"Runaway Amish: the Great Escape,"... offers a rare glimpse into the life of a brave young woman
  • Former Amish to sign copies of her book at Spring Grove Library next week
    "Runaway Amish: the Great Escape,"... offers a rare glimpse into the life of a brave young woman 
  • O.S. Johnson, Spring Grove's first historian, wrote the book called "Nybyggerhistorie fra Spring Grove og omegn, Minnesota" (Pioneer History from Spring Grove and around, Minnesota). 
  • Non-Norwegians came to Spring Grove too!
    One day while working at the Ballard House, I had a visit from a man from a neighboring town. I was eating my lunch so he sat down and started visiting. 
  • Anderson/Kvelve/von Krogh families revealed
    Several weeks ago I wrote about Inga Hendrickson and the Hendrickson Café. Since Inga has a very interesting heritage, I would like to share some of this information.

    I personally knew Inga, who was married to Percival Narveson. Percy, as we called him, was Spring Grove's historian and also wrote many articles for the Winona Daily News and the Spring Grove Herald. 
  • The editor of the Spring Grove Herald from May 1, 1919, to April 28, 1927, was Cornelius Cleveland Allen, more familiarly known as "C. C." or "Connie" Allen.

    At that time, the publisher of the Herald was B. L. (Bernt) Onsgard, father to Burnell, the grandfather of Fred Onsgard, who is now retired, the last Onsgard to publish the Herald. 
  • Just inside the main entrance to the Big Canoe Lutheran Church Cemetery (rural Decorah) in Winneshiek County, Iowa, are the graves of the Gjere ancestors. 
  • What do Margret Lommen Ranzenberger, Eloise Myrah Hoff, Beverly Storlie Thompson and others have in common? They are all descendants of Ove Martinus Olsen Aasum and his wife, Marie Jensdatter Braaten/Benson. 
  • Back in the late 1940s, there was a young flying farmer who would fly his airplane from the Hillsboro area of North Dakota to look after a land interest east of Spring Grove.

    The renter of the property at that time was Ole Ostern, who had a daughter by the name of LaVonne. This flying farmer proceeded to court LaVonne, and they were married Jan. 25, 1950. His name was Milton Jennings Aasen. When he flew down here, he probably landed on Sig Bergrud's field at the edge of Spring Grove. 
  • Do you remember Inga Hendrickson's Café and all her penny candy?

    What a thrill it was as a youngster to be given a few pennies with which we could go into her cafe and look through the glass-top case that was so scratched from the money being slid across the top. 
  • This is the story of a bachelor farmer living between Highlandville (Iowa) and Quandahl (Iowa) back in 1898.

    He was born June 20, 1845, on the farm Aarhus in Evanger, Voss, Hordaland, Norway, the son of Gullak Gullaksen Aarhus (1787-1856) and Ingeborg Larsdatter (1807-1859). 
  • From Sogndal, which is located on the Sognefjord in the area of Sogn og Fordane, Norway, came the Aarestad sisters.

    Anna Eriksdatter Aarestad had married Baard Qualey in Sogndal, Norway, on Nov. 21, 1850, and in April 1852 they came to America. 
  • Aanderud family leads 
to intriguing mystery
    When looking at the burials in our old cemetery next to Trinity Lutheran Church in Spring Grove, I came across the name of Peder Andersen Aanderud, born Nov. 24, 1846, in Vardal, Oppland, and died Nov. 12, 1866. 
  • When coming to America from Norway, some of these families used the name Aamodt/Aamoth. After living in this country for a period of time, many of the descendants changed the spelling from "Aa" to O and the name became Omodt/Omoth.

    Our former Trinity Lutheran Church Assistant Pastor Walter I. Aamoth used "Aa", and as far as I know that is the only family that lived in Spring Grove in later years that used that spelling. 
  • I consider Spring Grove to be the "melting pot" of Norway, meaning that people from all areas of Norway came to Spring Grove from their first destinations in Wisconsin and Illinois and other eastern states and at times even directly from Norway. Spring Grove became the first permanent Norwegian settlement in Minnesota. 
  • Over the years, I have been collecting information on the early settlers of Spring Grove and the surrounding communities, and I now would like to share a little of the information that I have collected through a column in the Spring Grove Herald. 
123
volunteers

Do you volunteer in your community?



 

Content 2014 © Bluff Country Newspaper Group
(507) 346-7365 • info@bluffcountrynews.com
Software 2014 © 1up! 
1998-2014 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved