Local News | Sports - High School | Contact Us
Tuesday, February 09, 2016 8:16 AM
In the 1930s a community project was enthusiastically encouraged by prominent businessmen to establish Spring Valley's popular recreation area known as Lake George.  It would provide swimming, golfing, boating, and much more. 

  • SV swimming hole brought great fun for all
    In the 1930s a community project was enthusiastically encouraged by prominent businessmen to establish Spring Valley's popular recreation area known as Lake George.  It would provide swimming, golfing, boating, and much more. 

  • McCormick machinery kept farmers in the fields

    Many years ago the local historical society rescued countless artifacts from the vandalized farm home of the Frank and Dollie Neill family, lastly the abode of Anna Neill Hare, near Hamilton.  Among the paperwork was a collection of papers from her brother, Ben, where he studied advertising brochures to learn how to spell.

  • Celebrating LIFE: perusing the pages of the magazine’s final issue

    Remember LIFE magazine?  No doubt way before your time.  After 1,863 issues and 36 years, they published their last special “double” issue in 1972; The Year in Pictures, cost 50 cents.  According to the editor, the magazine had been losing money for four years and Time, Inc. had to give it up.  So what was included in this final issue?

  • Winter snapshots through the decades

    This was “before my time” but in the 1930s my grandpa, Doc Boucsein, who was a veterinarian, had the fascinating contraption seen in one of the photos.  He had adapted his Model T Ford pickup to accommodate the ski attachment and, of course, added the chain drive to the back wheels.  

  • 1933 brings powerful storms, births and new laws

    Couldn't believe the archives had Tribunes from the 1930s and on July 6, 1933, there were headlines:  Wilbur "Dooley" Sample was electrocuted in a terrible incident.  There had been severe rain, hail and electrical storms causing a great deal of damage to power lines.  He and another electrician were repairing lines at the substation just east of town;  Sample had changed fuses on the main line, fully protected by rubber gloves and a rubber blanket.  He had just finished and called to Lloyd McConnell to try the power again.  Before this could happen, apparently he came in contact with the local line and fell to the ground.  Doctors Eby and Zittleman were called at once and worked for three hours to try to restore him, but to no avail.  Dooley was the maintenance superintendent of the local district for Interstate Power Co., and only 32 years of age. 

  • Excitement abounds in 1956 newspaper

    Sixty years ago — 1956 — and the Tribune featured a full-page ad for the grand opening of the Malt 'N Burger Drive In.  

     

  • Remembering life before smart phones

    When we carry "smart phones" or cell phones or other hand-held devices, it is a revelation to peruse the June 1956 Spring Valley Telephone Directory.  

  • Historical society celebrates Christmas traditions of Norway and Germany

    In 1986, the Spring Valley Historical Society decided to begin a series of ethnic Christmas events; the first one would feature Norway.  Can't be sure, but perhaps the event was in honor of J.I. Hamre who died in January of that year.  He had been society president in 1971 when the Pioneer Home Museum was acquired as its “home base.”  Joe had always been a devoted member and strong supporter. 

  • Area residents celebrate variety of Christmas traditions

    Can't believe it is 26 years ago (1989) when the local historical society celebrated a Dutch Christmas as their holiday event.  

  • Public telephone booths open new line of communication

    Wow!  A new phone booth!  What a fun picture.  The caption reads:  "Residents of Spring Valley and area now have 24-hour telephone service in the form of two outdoor booths which are now in operation here according to A.C. Leuhmann, Northwestern Bell Telephone manager.  

     

  • Newspaper offers plethora of area history

    The October 2, 1947, issue of the Spring Valley Tribune was a wonder.  

  • 1947 newspaper reveals new projects, thriving businesses and sports rivalaries

    The Oct. 2, 1947, issue of the Spring Valley Tribune was a delight to see.  Editor and publisher was Dick Pugh; business manager Wm. Starr; subscriptions were $2.50 per year, in advance.  Front page news covered about 22 major news items that caught your attention!

  • Local man donates delightful book full of Minnesota history

    As part of the W.P.A. (Works Progress Administration) of the ‘30s, a Federal Writers' Project emerged in 1937.  With countless writers, volunteers, historical societies, librarians and much more, a book was produced, "Minnesota - A State Guide."  

     

  • Local family business helped shape Spring Valley area

    What local business firm worked on the "Alcan" (Alaska) Highway in the WW II years?  What firm built the golf course at the Root River Country Club?  What firm dug out and operated "the fish ponds" northeast of town in the 1940s?  What firm built the Rushford municipal airport in the 1970s?  What firm was involved in a housing development in the 1960s, now located south of the high school and Faith United Methodist? What firm was a major earth-mover at the iron mines from 1942 to 1960?  By now you've figured it out — Freeman Construction Company of Spring Valley. 

  • The man I now live with — husband Don Oss — has a fascinating story to tell, and here's how it goes.  

Super Bowl

Who do you think will win the Super Bowl?


 

Content 2014 © Bluff Country Newspaper Group
(507) 346-7365 • info@bluffcountrynews.com
Software 2014 © 1up! 
1998-2016 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved