Local News | Sports - High School
 
Samples of barbed wire, patented 1875 to 1887 on display at the Ag Building; brochures from Ellwood Fences showing change in the style.
Samples of barbed wire, patented 1875 to 1887 on display at the Ag Building; brochures from Ellwood Fences showing change in the style.
<
1
2
>
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 10:01 AM

The lack of fencing these days, since many farmers till right up to the road or highway right of ways, caused us to really take a look around the countryside to see if and where fences were still used.  You may observe the same while you are driving; note where fences are used and why — to keep animals in?  to keep deer out?  to protect property from outsiders such as power stations? 

  • All fenced in: a brief history of fencing

    The lack of fencing these days, since many farmers till right up to the road or highway right of ways, caused us to really take a look around the countryside to see if and where fences were still used.  You may observe the same while you are driving; note where fences are used and why — to keep animals in?  to keep deer out?  to protect property from outsiders such as power stations? 

     
  • A salute to a local Navy man
    In honor of Veterans Day, this column salutes a local veteran who did his share of defending our country when he served in World War II.  To avoid being drafted into the army, Everett Grabau volunteered with the U.S. Navy, and tells us he served 38 months.   
  • The Neill family history lives on at local museum
    Many years ago the family of Frank Neill lived on a farm just north of the community known as Hamilton, north of Spring Valley.  Frank and Dollie Neill had three sons, Ben, Floyd and Winnie, and daughter Anna.   
  • High school scrapbook gives understanding of life in 1931
    My mother's high school scrapbook, A Bouquet of Memories, boasts memorabilia from the District Music Contest at Lake City on May 2, 1931.   
  • The saga of Tom Frankson: Politics, rampaging buffalo and South Park

    The saga of Tom Frankson continues this week as we consider the last half of his illustrious career as a noted entrepreneur. 

     
  • Following the Frankson family through the generations

    Here in Spring Valley lived a most notable entrepreneur named Tom Frankson.  Have you ever heard of the Frankson-Christianson Manufacturing Company? 

     
  • Improvements will be made at the Methodist Church Museum, pending available funds, but a little history is in order here.

     
  • A trip back in time touring Spring Valley
    Today we continue a review of the downtown business district compiled by old friend, Harry Johnson, the postman.  Harry lived his entire life in Spring Valley, growing up in the years when there were seven daily passenger and freight trains huffing and chuffing through Spring Valley.   
  • Celebrating the Class of 1954
    A totally reliable source of information again proved most helpful — a bound volume of the Spring Valley Tribune from 1954. Yes, the Class of '54 is planning their 60th anniversary reunion soon, and their yearbook does not contain much news from the community. However, the Tribune covered a long account of their senior class trip to Chicago, written by Jean Latcham, and that article will be shared with the classmates.  
  • Vintage advertising gives a view into days of old
    Recently a cousin sent a sizable box of old advertising cards given out by Spring Valley merchants in the “early days.”  Apparently it was a collection my grandfather, Harry Steffens, had accumulated for the scrapbook he was working on.   
  • Pieces of Spring Valley history: cameras, harnesses, catalogs and a wedding dress

    In my last column, an 1857 wedding dress was mentioned as being exhibited in the parlor at the Washburn-Zittleman historic home.  There is much more to the story and for that we thank Sharon Jahn, our diligent historian, who did considerable research on the matter.

     
  • Weddings abound at Spring Valley Historical Muesum
    In December 1993, the Spring Valley Historical Society hosted both a mock wedding and a real wedding at the Pioneer Home Museum. The Rev. Jon Olson presided, and acting as the bride and groom were Eric Reiland and Becky Rasmussen. However, one of the museum directors, Edna Hagen's own granddaughter, Janet Hagen, and Frank Waters were wed in the real ceremony. The reason this event has come to mind was because a real wedding took place at the Washburn-Zittleman historic home just recently. Your columnist, Mary Jo, was wed to her longtime friend, Don Oss, another Spring Valley native. 
  • Weather aids in changing face of Spring Valley
    The crops around Spring Valley look excellent compared to corn and bean fields not too far away. We will hope that hail or drought or whatever will not keep our farmers from harvesting a bumper crop this fall. Rain, which has prevented many area farmers from planting, sometimes at all, seems to have abated a bit. 
  • Pietenpol: The quiet genius
    This column was begun back in 2004, I think, and it's a total surprise that I have never done one on Bernard Pietenpol, one of our most noted citizens. Probably the reason was because his talents generated so many articles in the newspapers, magazines, etc. that I didn't need to call attention to his creative genius. 
  • Basic rules for clothes lines, circa 1930
    This list of rules was pretty much what we followed back in the 30s and 40s, long before the present day of clothes washers and dryers.   
Ebola

Do you think the media is blowing Ebola fears out of proportion, in relation to its spread to the United States?



 

Content 2014 © Bluff Country Newspaper Group
(507) 346-7365 • info@bluffcountrynews.com
Software 2014 © 1up! 
1998-2014 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved