The Fillmore County draft call for March 5, 1942.  These men may well have been serving at the time of the invasion.  Listed as knowns:  1) Eugene Arnett, Spring Valley; 2) Ray Underbakke, Canton; 3) Clifford Arneson, York;  4) John Stender, Wykoff; 5) William Drogemuller, Spring Valley; 6) Raymond Meyer, Wykoff; 7) Clifford Reed, Spring Valley; 8) Lawrence Hall, Chester, Iowa; 9) Harold Ullum, LeRoy; 10) Joe Randall, Spring Valley.
The Fillmore County draft call for March 5, 1942. These men may well have been serving at the time of the invasion. Listed as knowns: 1) Eugene Arnett, Spring Valley; 2) Ray Underbakke, Canton; 3) Clifford Arneson, York; 4) John Stender, Wykoff; 5) William Drogemuller, Spring Valley; 6) Raymond Meyer, Wykoff; 7) Clifford Reed, Spring Valley; 8) Lawrence Hall, Chester, Iowa; 9) Harold Ullum, LeRoy; 10) Joe Randall, Spring Valley.
Almost 70 years ago, June 6, 1944, the Rochester Post Bulletin issued a special "EXTRA" edition with enormous headlines: "Allies Invade French Coast." D-Day, with all its hopes, disasters, dreams and deaths, was upon the world. Although the Germans had earlier broadcast news of parachute landings on the Normandy coast, Commander General Dwight D. Eisenhower delayed his announcement until he was sure the assault had begun. News came from SHAEF, the Supreme Headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Forces, including troops from the U.S., Britain and Canada. Alerts were broadcast every ten minutes in French, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian and Flemish. General Pershing, who commanded American armies in France in World War I, issued the following statement: "As this overmastering military might of the Allies advances, it will be joined by the men of the occupied countries whose land has been over run by the enemy, but whose spirit remains unconquered."

President F.D.R. told the nation, "The victory over Germany is certain, but it will be tough and it will be costly." Britain's General Sir Bernard Montgomery, hero of the 8th Army victories in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, was in charge of the assault. To the east, the Germans were hard pressed by Russian military campaigns and forced to divide their armies between eastern and western fronts. Allied armies had captured Rome, and F.D.R. stated, "one up and two to go" meaning the Allies had accomplished that goal with plans to capture Berlin and Tokyo still ahead. He also stated "...the Germans have suffered heavy losses but not great enough to be driven to surrender."

U.S. battleships supported Allied landings, and coast guard units and the U.S. Marines were likewise participating. It was noted that German U-boats were active among the armada of 4,000 ships that crossed the English Channel to Europe. Massive airborne landings had been effected behind German lines, and hundreds of aircraft were hammering defenses. One American pilot reported the aircraft "..were thick as flies" as he flew on different assignments, patrolling the French coast to protect allied land, sea and air operations.

The "Extra" told of German propaganda to use "secret weapons" to turn back any assault. Their "rocket bombs" created some fear, but other weapons may have been less successful such as a fog grenade to conceal anything within 600 yards in blinding smoke; land mines made of wood or plastic to escape detection by metal-sensitive mine detectors; and a potent poison gas they threatened to use.

I visited with a gentleman who remembers delivering this Extra edition to his 62 customers. Of course, Saturdays were spent on "collections" that could sometimes prove difficult. For further "war news" please check your history books or at the library.

What else appeared in this brief edition? The "Hooded Order of Ku Klux Klan was disbanding." The Imperial Wizard was quoted as saying the reason for disbanding had been approved by members and was not a subject for discussion outside the Klan. It was noted that women voters could outnumber men in the coming election, with over 44 million voters in each category, plus the fact over 7 million men were in the armed forces.

Another article: "Diplomas were awarded to 28 graduates of Spring Valley High School." The commencement program opened with the processional played by Miss Hoyem. Keith Mlinar and Thelma Schmiedeberg received 3 year pins for work in the band as well as American Legion Auxiliary citizenship awards. They were among the honor students including Marjorie Uhrich and Shirley Andrews. Student addresses were given by Keith, Thelma, and Fay Kumm; the mixed chorus sang, and Superintendent of Schools, George Tracy, presented diplomas and awards.

Other wartime news was related to the rationing program, "Ration Roundup." Meats, fats: Book 4 red stamps now valid; Processed Foods: Book 4 blue stamps, now valid; Sugar: Book 4 stamps 30 and 31 good for 5 lbs., stamp 40 good for home canning; Shoes: Book 3 airplane stamps now valid; Gasoline: 10-A coupons good for 3 gals. through August, B-3 & C-3 coupons good for 5 gals; Fuel Oil: Period 4 & 5 coupons good through September.

New York news item: The navy yard noted that, breaking a 143 year tradition, women were now working as welders and electricians with men working on warship construction. "Of the 65,000 workers, 4,000 are women who have proved their worth."

Tonight on KROC radio, 1340 on your dial, Chesterfield's Fred Waring; AlkaSeltzer's News of the World; Dupont's Cavalcade of America; Firestone's Voice of Firestone; the Telephone Hour; Heinz Co.'s Information Please. Under want ads: a two-bedroom modern home, beautifully landscaped, half acre of land, garage, low taxes - $5,000. Other houses ranged from $3,600 to $7,000. Osco Drug carried an almost full page ad including ladies' anklets, 2 pair for nineteen cents; jar rings, 2 boxes for a nickel; 3 bars of Lifebuoy for fourteen cents; and an overnight bag for $1.50. The good old days, right? Thank you much to Paul Ness for sharing the newspapers and accompanying photo.