In the first row are Jerry Fenstermacher, Roland Davis, Vic Grabau, Lawrence Feldt, Roy Christopherson, Ray Freeman, co-captain Robert Finneseth, co-captain Roger Brownlow, Roger Jahns, Joe Schroeder, and Gene Fenstermacher. In the second row are manager Eugene Cook, Milton Rosenberg, Gordon Grabau, Jack Nash, David Sanford, Loren Byers, Bill Waldron, Robert Anderson, Bob Majors, Emmeth Hovden, Larry Moon, Kenneth Paul, and coach F.B. Conito. In back are Nat Collins, Dan Warren, Bob Paul, Donald Fenske, Chester Nightengale, Tom Mengis, Donald Byers, Jim Sample, Harold Turbenson, Richard Healy, Reuben Iverson and Robert Healy.
In the first row are Jerry Fenstermacher, Roland Davis, Vic Grabau, Lawrence Feldt, Roy Christopherson, Ray Freeman, co-captain Robert Finneseth, co-captain Roger Brownlow, Roger Jahns, Joe Schroeder, and Gene Fenstermacher. In the second row are manager Eugene Cook, Milton Rosenberg, Gordon Grabau, Jack Nash, David Sanford, Loren Byers, Bill Waldron, Robert Anderson, Bob Majors, Emmeth Hovden, Larry Moon, Kenneth Paul, and coach F.B. Conito. In back are Nat Collins, Dan Warren, Bob Paul, Donald Fenske, Chester Nightengale, Tom Mengis, Donald Byers, Jim Sample, Harold Turbenson, Richard Healy, Reuben Iverson and Robert Healy.
The word is getting around - the Class of '48 will meet for their 65th class reunion this coming weekend. Of the 29 graduates, half of the classmates are planning to attend; many still live in the area. Only seven are deceased.

The Spring Valley Tribune has no bound volume that dates to 1948, but some unknown benefactor donated a pile of tattered issues from the late 1940s, and it was a treat to peruse the fall of 1947 when the seniors were starting their last year. Superintendent was John Hollander, and on the dedication page of the yearbook, it reads: To C. L. Nightengale, our principal, without whose guidance and untiring efforts our annual would not have been possible, we, the graduates of 1948, dedicate this first issue of "Reflections."

High school faculty included Genevieve Hanson, Kathryn Ebert (soon to marry Burton Highum), Arne Gynild, Sabina Kretchman, Francis Conito, Helen Purington, Russell Simondet, and J.P. Roebuck. Heading the school board was George Gullickson, plus Harold Biel, Francis Kumm, Lloyd Finneseth, Ken Moon and F.J. Mengis. The "office girl" was Marjorie Dennestedt and janitors were Marion DeGroodt, Albert Jero, and Weber Littlefield. Names are spelled as they appear in the yearbook.

What was happening in Spring Valley that year? Big news garnered front-page headlines: the M.A. Hanna Mining Co. of Hibbing announced their plans for operating open pit iron mines south of town. They were to construct a crusher, washer and office five miles south on Highway 63, and half a mile east. Woodrich was contracted to haul ore to the Ostrander railroad to be shipped to the smelter at Granite City, Ill. Property to be worked was leased from Hadland, Bly and Simons. Sure enough, by October, operations expanded to the Kenneth Olson farm, and 30 to 35 rail cars were being shipped daily, aiming for 100,000 tons for the season.

A few ads in the available issues reminded us of the various businesses that kept Spring Valley busy. Hatley Motor Co. offered Ford, Mercury and Lincoln autos to whet the appetites of those who could afford a new car and Marchant's were promoting the Plymouth Fury. Gustafson Tire Service sold Goodyear tires at $14.40 less trade-in. The news came that new federal highway 16 would be routed through Spring Valley.

So where could you take your girlfriend? There was a roller rink at Ostrander, but, of course, the Torium (present community center) offered the same, plus movies. At Joe Mlinar's State Theatre, movies were on every night, and one week offered "The Time of Your Life" with James Cagney, William Bendix and Wayne Morris or "The Yearling" with Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman. Saturday nights, westerns might feature Hopalong Cassidy and Andy Clyde. Maybe a snack at Nash's Cafe? Guys could spruce up at Herb Finke's barbershop and the gals at Iva Ray's Beauty Salon or Lou's (Sprott) Beauty Shop. How about buying gifts? Try Harry Johnson, Jeweler, and Everett Sprott's Jewelry Store, maybe cosmetics at Holden's Rexall Drug. The Sward-Kemp Drug advertised the new Toni home permanent, only $2, including the new plastic curlers.

Clothing could be purchased at Leuthold & Majors - fine suits for "$35 to $55" - and Rosie's People's Store also catered to the men and boys. Woodward's had just remodeled, according to manager Ray Siewert, and Miss Cora Thompson's Hat Shop also featured dresses, as well as the Halbkat Store. Dry cleaning and altering was available with a fine staff on duty: Eng and Arnold Nelson, Cora Means, Emma Elton, Gladys Loucks, and Donald Westphal. Several grocers located on Broadway: Spiess Jack Sprat, Red Owl, Webster & Kohn, Kvale's IGA, and Halbkat's advertised two pounds of raisins for 35 cents. I'm guessing the guys all knew where they could get "Friendly Grain Belt" from the local Spring Valley distributors.

That summer, the 45-member high school band played Saturday night concerts downtown under the direction of Mr. Roebuck. Officers of the band were Vernon Jahn, Robert Finneseth, Norma Pretsch, Larry Moon and Irma Buss.

Other news: The Masonic Lodge hosted their annual coon dinner; chef Mike Eisenberg prepared 20 coons and 125 attendees enjoyed the repast. The Grange held a big event in the Odd Fellows hall, and Eastern Star held their monthly meetings there, as well. The village of Ostrander was laying water mains and building a 30,000-gallon water tower, which would be most helpful for fire protection. The high school football team defeated Lewiston for their Homecoming game with some stars noted: "George" Finneseth, Jerry Fenstermacher, and "Speed" Davis.

Homecoming queen was lovely Arlys Hellickson. Dr. Zittleman was elected mayor of the village that fall, and Myrtie Thayer as Justice of the Peace.

We suspect the Class of '48 "Wolves" will be sharing many memories of their good times at SVHS. Stop by the Methodist Church Museum to see class photos and memorabilia, (plus the real wolf!) and enjoy a guided tour of Spring Valley history.