The Amuzu Theater was located in the Lee Block, presently Sheldon Plumbing & Heating, on the corner of Broadway and Jefferson. Bought by K.K. Hande for his daughter Emma and her husband, Jack Wentworth, it was opened in 1912 by Wentworth first for silent pictures, then for ‘talkies’ in the late 1920s. Note Crown Clothing store next door, and business and residence along Jefferson Street.
The Amuzu Theater was located in the Lee Block, presently Sheldon Plumbing & Heating, on the corner of Broadway and Jefferson. Bought by K.K. Hande for his daughter Emma and her husband, Jack Wentworth, it was opened in 1912 by Wentworth first for silent pictures, then for ‘talkies’ in the late 1920s. Note Crown Clothing store next door, and business and residence along Jefferson Street.
A recent gift to the historical society was an edition of a November 1921 Spring Valley Mercury published and edited by F.E. Langworthy. It was fun to see the front-page news and peruse the ads of the local merchants who chose to buy advertising that particular week. An annual subscription was $2 and the editor was an affiliated member of the National Editorial Association and member of the American Press Association. It was billed as "Fillmore County's Greatest Newspaper, Est. 1880, Ever Loyal to our Country."

There was "Political Talk at the State Capitol as Heard by the Mercury Reporter...The political campaign for 1922 will soon begin with state conventions in March, primaries in June and general election in November...it can truly be said the lucky survivors will well merit their victory." How true. The War Finance Corp. planned to meet in the Corn Belt to endeavor to promote cooperation by the banks helping farmers in orderly marketing and feeding of livestock. The Fillmore County Farm Bureau offered a column on poultry work, how to cull the flock to promote higher grades of meat and egg production. The Women's Auxiliary of the Everett Hale Post of the American Legion was planning a bazaar to be held in the office of R.J. Gammell; "doughnuts and coffee; all funds for comfort of soldiers in various hospitals."

Church news: Rev. H.H. King is the new pastor at the E.U.B. Church (Evangelical United Brethren); Sunday Worship: 10:30; Christian Endeavor Society: 6:30. Gospel service: 7:30. Midweek prayer meeting Thursday at 7:30. At the Norwegian Lutheran: worship at 10:30, S.S. and Bible Class 12. Choir rehearsal Thursday at 7:30. Confirmation Class: Thursday 4 p.m. Ladies Aid Society at Mrs. Ole Aamot's, Thursday at 2:30. O. M. Langehough (pastor). At the M.E. Church: Sunday 10:30, S.S. 11:45, Evening 7:30; Thursday 7:30. The M.E. Ladies Aid will hold a supper Wednesday night at 5:30; prices 35 and 20 cents. Everett Hale, minister.

Ads were most revealing. P.R. Jorris (furniture and funerals) ran a full-page ad for the new phonographs: The New Edison, a period cabinet. When your phonograph is not playing, it is a piece of furniture, and Mr. Edison has replicated many period pieces: The exquisite Sheriton, authentic Jacobean, graceful Chippendale, William & Mary. Make an initial deposit sufficient to indicate good faith and we will deliver to your home!

Entertainment? Amateur night coming up at the New Amuzu on Saturday afternoon. Movies: Monday: Dorothy Gish in The Ghost in the Garrett; Tuesday: The Stream of Life; Wednesday: Excuse My Dust and a comedy; Thursday: The Last Chance and The Sky Ranger; Friday and Saturday: The Affairs of Anatole.

At Andersen's Opera House, Dance with Peavey's Orchestra on Monday evening. The Neawanna Campfire Girls will hold their annual meeting at Mrs. Brown's Hat Shop. The Spring Valley Band is planning a concert at the Amuzu - watch for further information. Mr. Arsers (band director) is offering instruction on all kinds of wind instruments, phone 291-L. Check Al Conklin's store for all kinds of skis - the King of Winter Sports.

Of interest to farmers: Selling your farm? Ask at Strout Farm Agency, local rep: U.S. DeGroodt, phone 128. Notice to farmers and horse owners from C.L. Nash & Son at the Brick Shop: resetting shoes, 25 cents; new shoes put on, 50 cents; Guarantee the best work and we handle your horses with care and kindness.

Skunks are prime now, and bring good prices - take them to Conklin, who also sells traps. Joe Guise is collecting furs at this time. The Tunnel Mill, Frank Boland, prop. Feed grinding repairs done and ready to go, grinding at rock bottom prices.

Personal items? Harry Bandle sells Kryptok spectacles and eyeglasses, invisible bifocals. Prince Albert (tobacco in a can) - "You'll get somewhere with your pipe and Prince Albert!" Purchase your hats at Mrs. Brown's Hat Shop and from Miss Cronin. Get your Munsing Suits and separate garments (?) at Miss E. Mueller's. J.J. Andrews is repairing old furniture and "doing upholstery of all kinds, my specialty." Faded switches colored to match hair; see Mrs. F.E. Langworthy. Benson's Modern Shoe Shop - you can rest assured that shoes repaired here are done properly and thoroughly!

Very few grocery ads, but always Blue Bird Breads at the Spring Valley Bakery - It's the only food for breakfast. Deliveries are made twice daily by Simons' Cash Grocery. The North Side Dairy, Earl Warner, Prop., Our Motto: Purity. Buy your syrup at the Farmers Supply Co.: gallon of white Karo, 65 cents; Argo gloss starch, eight cents a pound.

When it came to cars, Brown Bros. announced: Do not neglect your batteries! Bring in your storage batteries; we have the expertise for taking care of them in the proper way. Keuhn & Son have bought the Motor Inn Garage; during this slack season, we'll make special prices on overhauls; we do battery work, ignition, generators and all electrical work; all work guaranteed. The Professional Directory listed six physicians, one chiropractor, one dentist, two veterinarians, three attorneys, and four dray services.

However, on the back page, taking up every inch, probably the most controversial issue: "Special assessment for new paving in Spring Valley. Resolution passed at the council meeting for all of Section Avenue, Courtland, Jefferson, and Main." Costs ran from $296 to $2,895, most in the range of $500 to $700. Unanimously approved by the Spring Valley Council: E B. Davis, M.J. DeGroodt, A.L. Sheldon, Henry Stephenson and Lumen Land. It listed every property along all the named streets, and we can imagine the property owners may have been dismayed at their assessments; maybe like folks on South Broadway when we learned our assessments a year ago. However, progress may be costly but is necessary.

Have a happy summer - maybe less rain and more sunshine?