Subscribe | Job application | Contact Us
GO
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 9:38 AM
Minnesota has always been a leader in enacting policies to attempt to curb smoking. In 1975, Minnesota became the first state to restrict smoking in most public spaces with the Minnesota Clean Indoor Air Act. In 2007, smoking restrictions were extended to all public places, including bars, bowling alleys and entire restaurants, with the Freedom to Breathe Act.
  • Pioneer physician served community well
    We’ve been studying “History of Medicine in Fillmore County Prior to 1900” by Nora Guthrey, Mayo Clinic, Rochester.  It is a remarkably complete book with bios of all doctors in the county, and the last year that can be noted is 1941, so this book is at least 50 years old.  Following is a brief summary of a doctor who spent considerable time in Spring Valley.  
  • Toothless children both terrifying and cute
    I’m sure everyone has gone through that part of life between 7 and 14 (or thereabouts) when all their teeth started falling out of their head, only to be replaced with a spacious and gap-toothed grin.
  • Minnesota should follow Edina’s lead in restricting access to tobacco
    Minnesota has always been a leader in enacting policies to attempt to curb smoking. In 1975, Minnesota became the first state to restrict smoking in most public spaces with the Minnesota Clean Indoor Air Act. In 2007, smoking restrictions were extended to all public places, including bars, bowling alleys and entire restaurants, with the Freedom to Breathe Act.
  • Altar painting by noted artist back on display
    In 2007, I wrote a column entitled “A Real Learning Experience.”  It had to do with a visitor at the Methodist Church Museum who asked, “Is that altar painting by Herbjorn Gausta?”  We determined that it was indeed, and so we were instructed to contact Dr. Marian Nelson at the Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum at Decorah, who sent his booklet on the life of Herbjorn Gausta.
  • Unreasonable parents make children wear socks
    Last week I said my Mom had a grandparent mentality. This week, I thought I should balance that out with another fact about my Mom.
  • Parades unearth historical highlights
    Maybe there will be a parade coming up on our agenda? In the “old days” there was usually a marshal of the parade, mounted on a horse, that led all civic and “Decoration Day” parades.  Here are two of them as shown in the accompanying photographs. 
  • If you’ve ever had siblings, you’re probably familiar with the concept of the “baby of the family,” the youngest sibling who always seems to get away with everything. The Clan certainly has our baby of the family, but because there are so many of us, with a 16-year gap between the oldest and the youngest, it feels like there’s more than one “baby” in our family. My oldest siblings and I agree that the younger kids, particularly the last three or four, get away with things we never would have at their age.
  • Stories enrich communities, even if they haven’t experienced devastation
    I just about broke down and cried on the streets of Oklahoma City Sunday. The near-breakdown was after mile 20 of a marathon, which has been known to make a grown man cry, but it wasn’t the physical exertion, at least not only the physical exertion, that nearly brought me to tears.
  • Centennial event highlights SV businesses
    You are of considerable age when you remember these buildings on North Broadway Avenue shown in the accompanying photos.  This is 1955 when the city of Spring Valley was celebrating its 100th anniversary.  There was a BIG parade on Monday, July 4, with umpteen entries.
  • Spring signified by weather, wearing shorts, and mud
    I always feel spring is signified by a few key things.
  • Just showing up is powerful
    The pages of our newspapers often feature community leaders, star athletes, outstanding students, political figures and accomplished business people. However, they also often feature people who just show up to help.
  • No vigilante here, but we remain vigilant about proper use of words
    Although I would never advocate defacing public property, it’s hard to get angry with the “grammar vigilante” in England who ventures out at night to correct infractions against the English language spotted in public signs. Although he holds grudges against all forms of incorrect punctuation, he spends most of his time addressing wayward apostrophes using a tool he built himself, according to the BBC, which did a story on him while protecting his anonymity.
  • Notable SV graduate’s will benefits local groups
    During the centennial celebration in 1955, there appeared in the Tribune a tribute to one of Spring Valley’s noted graduates, Jessie Whitman.  Miss Whitman had accumulated an estate of over $100,000, which at that time was a considerable sum.  The terms of her will left many gifts to local organizations, specifically to the Memorial Methodist Church, the library and cemetery association.  The library and cemetery association acknowledged these were the first gifts of money they had received, and the unknown writer made this comment: “Let us hope these fine gestures may be a suggestion to others who wish to establish a permanent memorial to ones who have gone.”
  • Big families, free noisemakers not a good combination
    The Clan is a fairly musical family. I say this, not to brag, but because, whether we possess any musical talent or not, my family still likes music.
  • Seemingly simple solution  requires extensive research
    Can something so simple as a sponge — well, not exactly a simple sponge, but a sponge nonetheless — undo the damage from President Donald Trump’s rollback of regulations on the coal industry?
Looking for something older? Try our archive search
Memorial Day

Do you plan to attend a Memorial Day service next Monday?


 

Content 2014 © Bluff Country Newspaper Group
(507) 346-7365 • info@bluffcountrynews.com
1998-2017 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved