St. Johns teacher Susan Nash and her students, Olivia Drees and Dylan Schultz, are dressed as centenarians to celebrate 100 Day, or the hundredth day of school last week.
St. Johns teacher Susan Nash and her students, Olivia Drees and Dylan Schultz, are dressed as centenarians to celebrate 100 Day, or the hundredth day of school last week.
Wednesday was 100 Grand. Kindergarten, pennies, checkers, ants, pledges and centers counted ... And the parochial first graders got wiggy with it. "I told them, 'A hundred days ago, you didn't know how to say the Pledge of Allegiance,' and they looked at me for a minute until they realized that they didn't know it, that that was the first day of school and they've learned so much since then," said Kingsland kindergarten teacher Marilyn Erdman as her students observed the 100th day of school and celebrated the number 100 on Feb. 13. First, in order to understand the number, they started their day by wearing hand-painted T-shirts with a one and two zeros on them, then counted out 100 pennies, checkers, pumpkin seeds, crayons, gumdrops, peanuts, toys, marshmallows and more into Ziploc bags. To better explore the concept, they went on to tour six centers in Erdman's classroom, including an estimation center with a tub of "100 Grand" candy bars as the subject of estimation, a reading center where they listened and read the book "A Hundred Hungry Ants," a puzzle center at which they fit together pieces of a 100-piece puzzle with picture of a unicorn and fairies on it, a crown-making center at which they made bejeweled and confetti-ed construction paper chapeaus with "100" glued to the front, a dot-to-dot picture station with a drawing of a puppy to outline beginning at one and ending at 100, and a snack station featuring 10 different snacks - including pretzels, gummy bears, chocolate chips and more - to count out 10 each and combine into one Ziploc for the ultimate "100" snack. Down the road in Wykoff, Susan Nash's first graders at St. Johns Lutheran School marked "100 Day" by aging slightly ... from 7 years old to 100 years by dressing as centenarians. Nash put on a wig, an apron, a sign and at least half a century when she got out of bed Wednesday morning, shuffling about school with a cane and the sign around her neck reading "100 and Still Going!" Several students appeared as fresh-faced little old men and women who were still ready to take on the jungle gym. Back at Kingsland, Erdman's students rounded up their "100 Day" with a review of the victories and troubles of counting to 100, noting that the listening center "was the best," and the snack center posed some troubles because "we kept forgetting how to count." Erdman reminded them that there's always an adult or friend available - though likely not a centenarian - to ask if one is in doubt about how to get from the beginning to that glorious number, 100.