The Chatfield Masonic Lodge and Eastern Star light globes will be lit whenever the organizations are meeting in their space above the Adourn store on Chatfield’s Main Street. The globes have recently been restored by Masonic Lodge member Zeb Dudek. Another, for the Royal Arch of the Masons, is missing, but they hope to find it to add to the lighting unit.  GRETCHEN MENSINK LOVEJOY/CHATFIELD NEWS
The Chatfield Masonic Lodge and Eastern Star light globes will be lit whenever the organizations are meeting in their space above the Adourn store on Chatfield’s Main Street. The globes have recently been restored by Masonic Lodge member Zeb Dudek. Another, for the Royal Arch of the Masons, is missing, but they hope to find it to add to the lighting unit. GRETCHEN MENSINK LOVEJOY/CHATFIELD NEWS
Masonic Lodge #56.

They'll leave the light on for ya.

"Whenever one of the organizations is meeting, the lights will be lit - if the Lodge is meeting, their light will be on, and if it's the Eastern Star, their light will be on. We used to have a Royal Arch of the Masons light, but nobody knows what happened to it," said Chatfield Masonic Lodge #56 member Zeb Dudek.

He referred to the milk glass globes that hang outside the Lodge's meeting hall, upstairs from the Adourn furniture shop on Main Street.

"But people who belong to another Lodge can be driving through town, see that our lights are on and stop in as visitors."

The local Masons are proud to have had Dudek restore their lights to near-original condition, as the globes had faded and the armature on which they were mounted had deteriorated.

"We started working on it last fall when the Adourn store opened - before they put lights on the building, we decided to take the globes down, with the intent to redo them," Dudek explained. "We thought that since Adourn was doing such a nice job making the front of the building look good, we decided to take our globes down, buff them out, repaint them. The last they were repainted was about 30 years ago, and some of the older Lodge members told me that they believed that Harvey Bernard was the last person to repaint them. I've seen pictures of downtown Main Street from 1936, and they're hanging there."

Dudek observed that the milk glass globes are exactly like the globes one would find on a gas pump from the 1920s, only flipped upside down.

"I had to clean them up," he said. "They were covered in rust stains - the rain ran down the metal framework, so a lot of the globes are actually permanently stained, but I was able to buff that out before I repainted them. I repainted the metal framework as well, because that was all rusty."

The Masonic Lodge number on the globes may not be the current numbers, but the lights are prized all the same for their historic value.

"Our Lodge is number 56, not 25 like it says, but it closed during the Civil War and we had to turn in our charter because there weren't enough members," Dudek explained. "Probably between the '40s and '50s, the Lodge petitioned to have the original charter back, and the markings are actually etched into the glass, not just hand-painted on."

Dudek said the etchings actually made it easier to repaint the globes and it didn't take too long.

"I've probably got about 16 hours in cleaning, repainting and buffing them," he shared. "First, I used some paint that was supposed to be long-lasting, but that started to chip off right away, so I went to a shop in Rochester and bought some enamel model car paint and added some lacquer over that so that the new paint will last."

Dudek was particularly nervous about taking the globes down and putting them back up again because of the way they are secured to the light fixtures - three screws mounted on the rim of each fixture must be tightened to hold them in, but not tightened too far.

"I was nervous because of how old they are. I was afraid that I'd drop them, or that if I tightened the screws too far, I'd crack the globes, or if I didn't tighten them enough, they'd fall off," he admitted.

Dudek considered having a reproduction made to replace the Royal Arch globe, but found that it was cost prohibitive, so the wait is long to find out what has become of it.

"I've searched high and low for the third globe, even though we don't have a Royal Arch chapter anymore, because I think it would be so cool to fill the third hole and to have that last one back for historic purposes. I'm hoping that someone might know what happened to it...maybe it's in an attic somewhere," he said.

Standing back from his work on Main Street, he pointed out that while "many people don't even know they're there," it's still a friendly light on for fellow Masonic Lodge members traveling the lanes of Highway 52.