Local News | Sports - High School
 
Tuesday, May 26, 2015 9:17 AM

During a conversation with a local woman who is interested in getting young people to vote and become more involved in the political process, a comment she made stunned me for a moment. She said that the parents of young people today have never seen effective government in action.

  • During a conversation with a local woman who is interested in getting young people to vote and become more involved in the political process, a comment she made stunned me for a moment. She said that the parents of young people today have never seen effective government in action.

     
  • As I was wandering through the finish area of the Almanzo 100 in Spring Valley Saturday around 5 p.m. with my camera, I was stopped a couple times by bicyclists, handed cell phones and asked if I could take “selfies” of them. They didn’t ask for anything in the background, just a photo of them after finishing the 100-mile race on gravel roads throughout Fillmore County that took about eight hours.

     
  • From 2008 to 2011, Duane Benson spent much of his time being an advocate for the state’s youngest residents, pushing for quality early childhood learning. The former state senator and Lanesboro area farmer was the executive director of the Minnesota Early Learning Foundation (MELF) at the time.

     
  • Monday morning as I was flying from Pittsburgh to Minnesota, I was writing this column, editing news stories, formatting photos and, if I had time, designing pages for this week’s edition. In other words, I was at my desk, which just happened to be a laptop more than 10,000 feet above earth.

     
  • Minnesota State FFA Secretary Valerie Earley was the main speaker at the Spring Valley-Wykoff FFA banquet last week. She felt at home since it really has been home for the Wykoff resident, who noted she is a “proud” member of the chapter even though she graduated from Kingsland High School in 2014.

     
  • The controversy surrounding the “religious freedom” laws some states have tried to enact and the fatal incidents involving white police shooting black suspects have led to national dialogue on institutional discrimination or prejudice. Activists are inspecting laws and internal policies to make sure people are treated equally.

     
  • Indiana was in the national spotlight last week after the Legislature passed a “religious freedom” law that was signed by Gov. Mike Pence. Although the original intent may have held true to its name, many thought it was a smokescreen to allow businesses to discriminate against people by citing religious beliefs if they get sued.

     
  • A Republican proposal to give the nearly $1.9 billion state surplus back to residents — about $350 per person — appears to be dead as legislators, including many Republicans, have other ideas this session. They include investing some of the excess money in education, budget reserves to prevent some of the problems the state has experienced in recent years, and public infrastructure, which has been neglected in recent years.

     
  • I often pick on the meteorologists for their inaccurate weather forecasts. For example, Sunday’s original forecast for light snow was recalculated to a prediction of up to three to five inches Saturday and then recalculated yet again early Sunday afternoon to a winter storm warning after it was evident this was not a minor event.

     
  • This week is Sunshine Week. The name has nothing to do with the actual sun, which has been warming our area well above normal this past week. The week is a national initiative to promote dialogue about open government that should operate in the light of day, rather than secretly in the dark.

     
  • With a sparse crowd attending the meet-the-candidates sessions for District 1 Fillmore County commissioner, the question came up last Thursday if candidates are responsible for engaging constituents in the process and, if so, how would that be done. The sessions were set up for three weeks — one night for each candidate — in Spring Valley for people voting in the special election on March 31.

     
  • When Kevin Slimp stepped outside the door of the community room at F & M Community Bank in Preston Friday after a seven-hour session with staff members of Bluff Country Newspaper Group, he said, “It really doesn’t feel that cold here.” This statement is from a resident of Knoxville, Tennessee, who first ventured out that morning in a temperature of 16 below zero.

     
  • Vina Lund, an Ostrander resident who just celebrated her 105th birthday, was asked by a reporter during her birthday party to confirm a story her son told about her dancing with the notorious outlaw, Babyface Nelson, at the Sheep Shed in Wykoff.

     
  • The butterfly effect — the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil setting off a tornado in Texas — is a term used in chaos theory to describe how tiny variations can have a significant impact on giant, complex systems, such as weather patterns.

     
  • I spent another day at school last week as a volunteer to help in the classroom of my third grade granddaughter. It’s through a program called WatchDOGS — the DOGS stands for Dads, or in my case grandDads, Of Great Students.

     
Cruise Ships

Would you go on a cruise despite all the negative attention they have been receiving?



 

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